12 tips to combat depression

This list seams simple enough but in reality when we are in a funk it is hard to remember or even doing one of them. It takes real strength and courage to get moving.

http://www.ptsdjournal.com/posts/12-tips-to-motivate-yourself-when-depressed/

Please vote for the app

If the app wins it will have more exposure and reach more people. Our chances to save someone are greater.

https://bestmobileappawards.com/app-submission/no-warriors-left-behind?utm_medium=badge&utm_source=badge&utm_campaign=nominee_badge

Suicide is around the corner.

This is some more of the information I was able collect at the Medical Center in Fort Hood, Texas. This information can help #military, #veterans, any one with #PTSD, #mentalhealth problems, and #mentalhealthillnes. People like #katespade and #anthonybourdain could had used.

Collecting Life Saving Info

Today I took some time to go to the Medical Center in Fort Hood to asked if they have PTSD resources both on base and out. The entire 3rd floor with in the hospital is dedicated to mental health. I collected some good information. I was happy to see that there are Christian information all over the 3 rd floor hallways. Our Daily Bread when I opened the little book it landed on a page title; Into Our Storm.

Finding Purpose PTSD

Many people think PTSD is the root of all mental health problems among veterans. This oversimplification is often reinforced by behaviors considered abnormal. One veteran I spoke with claimed to have stopped a dangerous driver, thrown him out of the car, and “gave him a life lesson.” Most people would accuse the veteran of needing anger management […]

via Military Betrayal, Civilian Isolation — Finding Purpose

Free app with a free book.

No Warriors Left Behind 1

 

Check out the app: No Warriors Left Behind. Now downloadeble on IPhones and Android. 

Helping prevent suicide among veterans. Because ONE suicide among veterans is too many.

The free book is located under PTSD Facts

On Missing Combat

Throughout thirty-five interviews with Canadian veterans of Afghanistan and a review of several war memoirs and documentary accounts, missing combat stood out as one of the most common sentiments. …

Source: On Missing Combat

Why I Explain My PTSD by My Symptoms

Explain PTSD symptoms - your specific symptoms - to friends. Explaining the specifics of your PTSD symptoms can reduce stress and ease symptoms. Find out why.

https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/traumaptsdblog/2017/05/why-i-explain-my-ptsd-by-my-symptoms/

It can be difficult to explain posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms to friends, but it helps me to do so. PTSD symptoms include an array of possibilities such as anxiety, depression, panic attacks, difficulty bonding, addiction, insomnia, and dissociation. People experience PTSD in very different ways, based on their trauma history, resilience, supports and a myriad of other factors. So here is why I find it beneficial to explain how my specific PTSD symptoms manifest themselves, and why you might too.

Explain What PTSD Symptoms Look Like to Friends

Many people have a narrow definition of PTSD. With so many veterans developing PTSD, it is understandable that a common perception of PTSD involves someone who has been in a combat situation. However, PTSD is not choosy. It impacts the military, emergency response personnel, victims of abuse, witnesses to abuse, and other individuals who have experienced significant trauma.

When I tell someone I have PTSD it is because I want them to understand me better. I want them to know that at times I might appear spacey or inattentive, react poorly to sudden changes in routines or plans, become hypervigilant in unfamiliar spaces, and seldom get enough sleep. In explaining my PTSD symptoms, I hope to set the stage for supportive interactions when my symptoms manifest.

If you find yourself avoiding situations or backing out of plans at the last minute or you feel trapped at times because you become anxious or agitated, it might be a chance to share some of your symptoms with friends and talk about how they impact you when they appear. It doesn’t even require much detail. For example, I tell friends, “I am hoping to come to your party, but I often get very nervous thinking about being around strangers, so I may not be in the right frame of mind to be there.”

Explain PTSD by Symptoms to Reduce Them

Once I began to explain my PTSD symptoms to my friends, something interesting happened. I found myself attending more functions, more comfortable asking someone to repeat themselves when I had lost focus on the conversation, and more able to respond to last-minute requests by taking a few moments to process. My friends and acquaintances have even begun to show me support by giving me advanced notice for changes, inviting me to arrive at gatherings early, or asking me if I need a break or would like to get some fresh air when we are in tight spaces.

By sharing my triggers and reactions, I have made it easier to join in activities. I find that knowing I have a way out of an uncomfortable situation that those around me can understand removes a significant amount of worry. When my stress is lower, my symptoms are more in control.

Do you have any thoughts on this? How much do you explain to friends and family about your symptoms? Please join in the conversation by leaving a comment below.