Kristy Grieb, Suicide June 13, 2017

Would you help me #prevent #suicide? Do you know that 22 #veterans #military are committing #suicide a day, along with other #civilians? No Warriors Left Behind app could save a life. #PTSD #army #navy Download today! #Free #USA

Military Gathering

This is an invitation to all veterans to join at Crossroads on 8/21/18 at 6:30 pm in meeting room C. Our goal is to bring the veteran community together to be a force of action, a force for good, and to explore what God wants from us – our next set of orders. There are many veterans in our midst that are isolated and needing support. They may be unaware there are other veterans around to support them. This is open to all veterans. Snacks and drinks provided.

Veteran community

A day of #guns, the smell of gun powder, and #veterans/#military family is one good remedy for #depression or #anxiety for some of us. Spending time we people that speak the same language as we do is a very good thing. I’ve been promote the app to this warriors and the have like it a lot. I hope the promote it in their circle.

Free app with a free book.

No Warriors Left Behind 1

 

Check out the app: No Warriors Left Behind. Now downloadeble on IPhones and Android. 

Helping prevent suicide among veterans. Because ONE suicide among veterans is too many.

The free book is located under PTSD Facts

How Social Rejection Increases Opiate Addiction

Image result for drugs picture
“As far as your brain is concerned, a broken heart is not so different from a broken arm.” —Naomi Eisenberger, PhD

Social rejection is painful.

When we feel rejected, our self-worth is dealt a heavy blow. We lose a sense of security, a sense of belonging, and perhaps a sense that we matter.

At its most extreme, the pain from social rejection can lead to suicide, according to the interpersonal theory of suicide.

Although we know social rejection is painful, neuropsychological research has revealed how social rejection affects the same regions of the brain as physical pain, and therefore respond similarly to the affect of painkillers.

In the study, participants were given acetaminophen (commonly known as Tylenol), or a placebo pill. After three weeks of regular doses, those who received the drug reported lower levels of social pain, in addition to showing lower levels of pain in fMRI brain scans:

…acetaminophen reduced neural responses to social rejection in brain regions previously associated with distress caused by social pain and the affective component of physical pain…

These findings are particularly relevant given the recent opioid epidemic. Beyond over-prescription and their highly addictive properties, this drug of choice might also tell us something about the health of our social context.

Beyond coping with physical pain, individuals who feel rejected may be self-medicating with opioids to cope with social pain.

We can see this phenomenon in studies on populations with a heightened risk of opiate use: groups with low income, low education, those lacking permanent housing, those who are unmarried, recently released prison inmates, veterans, and LGBT groups.

Once someone begins experiencing an opiate addiction, they may then find themselves feeling even further rejected, especially if it results in heightened poverty. In turn, this perpetuates the downward spiral of self-medicating to further reduce the social pain, in addition to the physical pain of withdrawal.

Promoting social health means combating barriers to social integration. These barriers include stigma, prejudice, economic inequality, and lack of social programs/support for individuals undergoing major life transitions, as seen among veterans in transition to civilian life.

When treating and preventing opiate addiction, we need to be mindful of the social dimension of the issue, in addition to the biological and psychological.

 

https://socialhealth.blog/2017/08/27/painkillers-reduce-pain-from-social-rejection/

On Missing Combat

Throughout thirty-five interviews with Canadian veterans of Afghanistan and a review of several war memoirs and documentary accounts, missing combat stood out as one of the most common sentiments. …

Source: On Missing Combat

Why I Explain My PTSD by My Symptoms

Explain PTSD symptoms - your specific symptoms - to friends. Explaining the specifics of your PTSD symptoms can reduce stress and ease symptoms. Find out why.

https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/traumaptsdblog/2017/05/why-i-explain-my-ptsd-by-my-symptoms/

It can be difficult to explain posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms to friends, but it helps me to do so. PTSD symptoms include an array of possibilities such as anxiety, depression, panic attacks, difficulty bonding, addiction, insomnia, and dissociation. People experience PTSD in very different ways, based on their trauma history, resilience, supports and a myriad of other factors. So here is why I find it beneficial to explain how my specific PTSD symptoms manifest themselves, and why you might too.

Explain What PTSD Symptoms Look Like to Friends

Many people have a narrow definition of PTSD. With so many veterans developing PTSD, it is understandable that a common perception of PTSD involves someone who has been in a combat situation. However, PTSD is not choosy. It impacts the military, emergency response personnel, victims of abuse, witnesses to abuse, and other individuals who have experienced significant trauma.

When I tell someone I have PTSD it is because I want them to understand me better. I want them to know that at times I might appear spacey or inattentive, react poorly to sudden changes in routines or plans, become hypervigilant in unfamiliar spaces, and seldom get enough sleep. In explaining my PTSD symptoms, I hope to set the stage for supportive interactions when my symptoms manifest.

If you find yourself avoiding situations or backing out of plans at the last minute or you feel trapped at times because you become anxious or agitated, it might be a chance to share some of your symptoms with friends and talk about how they impact you when they appear. It doesn’t even require much detail. For example, I tell friends, “I am hoping to come to your party, but I often get very nervous thinking about being around strangers, so I may not be in the right frame of mind to be there.”

Explain PTSD by Symptoms to Reduce Them

Once I began to explain my PTSD symptoms to my friends, something interesting happened. I found myself attending more functions, more comfortable asking someone to repeat themselves when I had lost focus on the conversation, and more able to respond to last-minute requests by taking a few moments to process. My friends and acquaintances have even begun to show me support by giving me advanced notice for changes, inviting me to arrive at gatherings early, or asking me if I need a break or would like to get some fresh air when we are in tight spaces.

By sharing my triggers and reactions, I have made it easier to join in activities. I find that knowing I have a way out of an uncomfortable situation that those around me can understand removes a significant amount of worry. When my stress is lower, my symptoms are more in control.

Do you have any thoughts on this? How much do you explain to friends and family about your symptoms? Please join in the conversation by leaving a comment below.