Free app with a free book.

No Warriors Left Behind 1

 

Check out the app: No Warriors Left Behind. Now downloadeble on IPhones and Android. 

Helping prevent suicide among veterans. Because ONE suicide among veterans is too many.

The free book is located under PTSD Facts

Many Veterans Are Denied Benefits for Vaccine Injuries

 

Children and adults injured or killed by vaccines face a long uphill battle when filing for compensation with the U.S. vaccine injury compensation program (VICP), better known as “vaccine court.”
American war veterans injured by vaccines face even grimmer prospects, as veterans appear to be routinely denied benefits for vaccine-related injuries. Part of the problem is that proving a vaccine caused the illness can be difficult, and it’s even more difficult when side effects are not carefully tracked and documented.
Remarkably, the U.S. military does not track any vaccine-related side effects or injuries, even though military personnel receive a number of mandatory vaccines, and despite the fact that concerns over vaccine-related injuries led to the creation of the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Vaccine Healthcare Centers (VHC) Network in September 2001.1,2
Military Personnel Blame Health Problems on Controversial Smallpox Vaccine
Fox News Boston3 recently highlighted the cases of Sean Kelly and Mark Bailey, two Marine veterans who developed chronic pericarditis (inflammation of the pericardium, the protective lining around the heart), which is a known possible side effect of the smallpox vaccine.4,5
Unable to work due to the chronic chest pain, Kelly filed for benefits with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) but was denied. He was also unable to file a claim with VICP, as the smallpox vaccine is not a covered vaccine. Other programs dedicated to compensating people injured by the smallpox vaccine were also unavailable, as too much time had lapsed. Suing the government for damages for injury that occurs during military service is also out of the question (Feres Doctrine).
Dr. Bradley Bender, chief of staff for the North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, agreed it can be “quite difficult” to receive VA benefits for a vaccine injury, “especially if you don’t have the records that reflect it. There is no blood test that you can do to say this is myocarditis related to smallpox vaccine.”6 Barbara Loe Fisher, director of the National Vaccine Information Center (NVIC), told Fox News 25:
“That’s just ridiculous, the smallpox vaccine is the most reactive vaccine that has ever been used … They do not want to acknowledge that when these vaccines are given, there are far more people being hurt than they’re willing to admit.”
Is Smallpox Vaccine Wreaking Havoc on US Service Personnel?
Between December 2002 and May 2014, more than 2.4 million service members received the smallpox vaccine.7 This, despite the fact that smallpox (variola) was eradicated in the early 1970s, and routine smallpox vaccination of the American public ceased in 1972.8 The U.S. government began inoculating service members against smallpox in the wake of the September 11, 2001, attacks, ostensibly to protect them against potential biowarfare using the variola virus.
In the last decade (2007 through April 2017), 898 veterans were granted VA benefits for pericarditis; 2,896 were denied. Another 5,703 veterans were granted benefits for myocarditis, inflammation of the heart muscle itself, while 12,067 were denied benefits for the same.9 Since no one appears to be monitoring, tracking and reporting vaccine side effects in military personnel, there’s no telling how many of these cases of myocarditis and pericarditis might have been related to the smallpox vaccine.
While the DOD does not track vaccine injuries, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) has stated that up to 2 percent of vaccinated individuals may experience side effects that “could result in disability or death,” adding that:
“Some service members who received [anthrax and smallpox] vaccines experienced severe reactions such as migraines, heart problems and the onset of diseases including diabetes and multiple sclerosis … Some of these events may occur coincidentally following immunization, while others may truly be caused by immunization.”10
DOD’s VHC Network Is Clearly Failing in Its Mission

According to the GAO, the purpose of the VHC Network is to “meet the health care needs of service members receiving mandatory immunizations. This includes educating service members about how to prevent adverse events and diagnosing and treating those with severe reactions.”11 Yet that does not appear to be happening, at least not routinely or as a matter of course.
Dr. Frank Fisher, Lt. Col. in the Air Force Reserve Medical Corps, claims the technician who gave him the anthrax vaccine refused to answer any of his questions about the shot he’d been given.12 She wouldn’t even disclose the type of vaccine he’d received. Following this injection, Fisher developed bone marrow loss, Tourette’s syndrome and a breathing disorder. His and other vaccine-injured service members’ firsthand accounts are included in the Democracy Now! report above.
Anthrax Vaccine Linked to Gulf War Sickness

Download Interview Transcript
In 1997, the DOD announced it would vaccinate all military personnel against anthrax. As noted by Dr. Meryl Nass13 — a leading expert on the anthrax vaccine — there were significant questions about the vaccine’s safety and effectiveness from the very start. In a 2002 paper14 published in the American Journal of Public Health, Nass notes that, “The anthrax vaccine was never proved to be safe and effective. It is one cause of Gulf War illnesses, and recent vaccinees report symptoms resembling Gulf War illnesses.”
In her paper, she also pointed out the DOD has acknowledged the systemic reaction rate for the anthrax vaccine is as high as 35 percent, not the 0.2 percent listed on the package insert. Vaccine studies conducted by the military have reported even higher rates of systemic reactions — as high as 48 percent. An unpublished survey at the Dover Air Force Base found the rate of “chronic, unresolved reactions” associated with the anthrax vaccine was 29 percent.
Gulf War Syndrome is a blanket term for “a cluster of medically unexplained chronic symptoms that can include fatigue, headaches, joint pain, indigestion, insomnia, dizziness, respiratory disorders and memory problems.”15
Not surprisingly, there were financial conflicts of interest at play when this vaccine was added to the military’s list of mandatory vaccines, which Nass detailed in her interview. Hundreds of military personnel began falling ill once the anthrax vaccine became routine, and many within the military began fighting the mandate. The movement culminated in no less than 13 congressional hearings on the various aspects of the anthrax vaccine program. Yet it continues.
Anthrax Threat May Be Overblown
To this day, the VA downplays the possible side effects of the anthrax vaccine,16 limiting descriptions of signs of serious reactions to things like wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness and dizziness, making no mention of its possible link to the “cluster of medically unexplained chronic symptoms” associated with Gulf War Syndrome.
The justification for the continued use of the anthrax vaccine is that the risk of side effects is better than contracting the disease, which is usually contracted through the skin by direct exposure to an infected animal, or animal waste and by-products, or contaminated soil. Veterinarians, farmers and researchers working with animals are at higher risk of being infected with anthrax, which can enter the bloodstream from a cut in the skin, inhaling anthrax spores into the lungs or by swallowing anthrax spores.
Indeed, anthrax disease is a very serious bacterial infection that can kill within days as lethal toxins from the anthrax bacteria multiply in the body if antibiotics are not given immediately. The mortality rate for skin-acquired anthrax left untreated is 10 to 20 percent, but the mortality rate for anthrax that is inhaled into the lungs or through the gastrointestinal tract is much higher.
Unlike most other bacteria, the anthrax bacterium forms potent spores that can remain alive under harsh conditions for 100 years or longer. Once the ideal conditions are present once again, the spores can open up and start reproducing. If the spores germinate, they reproduce and create additional spores that can again survive for a century or more.
The rugged survivability of the anthrax spore is what makes anthrax a potentially effective threat if weaponized and dropped from an airplane or exploded in a bomb, for example, effectively contaminating an area forever. Once the spores are inhaled they can cause overwhelming infection, and can be lethal in as little as two to seven days.
However, that doesn’t mean an anthrax vaccine given to every soldier is necessary. The anthrax bacterium is very responsive to antibiotics and, if administered before symptoms develop, antibiotics tend to be 100 percent effective, according to Nass. The only type of antibiotic that does not work is the cephalosporins, as anthrax is naturally cephalosporin-resistant. As noted by the NVIC, anthrax bacteria are also destroyed by hydrogen peroxide and diluted formaldehyde.17
Granted, there may be genetically engineered strains of anthrax out there somewhere, designed to resist modern antibiotics. But even then, the threat may not be as great as they make it out to be, because anthrax is not contagious. You must be directly exposed to the spores to get sick, and you cannot spread it to others, which means the vaccine itself is probably a far greater health threat to military personnel than the threat of anthrax infection.
Oral Polio Vaccine Also Linked to Gulf War Syndrome
In 1996, researchers also suggested that the live oral polio vaccine (OPV) contaminated with animal retroviruses may be playing a role in Gulf War Syndrome, prompting the NVIC to call for an investigation into that vaccine, as well as the multiple other vaccines, experimental drugs and environmental toxins that were given simultaneously to soldiers deploying for the Gulf War. At the time, NVIC wrote:18
“The Pentagon directed that military personnel heading for the Gulf receive as many as 17 different live viral and killed bacterial vaccines simultaneously, including polio, cholera, hepatitis B, adenovirus, influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, meningococcus, plague, rabies, tetanus, diphtheria, typhoid, yellow fever, anthrax and the experimental botulinium toxoid. In addition, they were given the experimental drug pyridostigmine bromide, a nerve agent.
NVIC … has been a vocal critic of the lack of credible scientific studies supporting the safety of simultaneous administration of multiple viral and bacterial vaccines and the lack of scientific studies to identify high risk populations.
‘The question that must be answered immediately,’ said NVIC co-founder and president Barbara Loe Fisher, ‘is whether a significant minority of Gulf War veterans responded with immune suppression to the potpourri of live viral and killed bacterial vaccines given to them and were subsequently vulnerable to further immune and neurological damage when they were given drugs and came into contact with environmental toxins in the Gulf.’”
Indeed, a decade-old VHC Network PowerPoint presentation19,20 claims the smallpox and anthrax vaccines are quite safe, blaming the high rate of injury instead on the practice of giving multiple vaccines simultaneously and/or drug-vaccine interactions. According to that presentation, of 2.4 million vaccinated service members, up to 48,000 of them (2 percent) sustained disability requiring them to be taught new skills and/or died as a result of serious side effects of the vaccines given.
This presentation, dating back to 2007, also touches on myo/pericarditis as a side effect of not only the smallpox vaccine but also the anthrax vaccine. For the smallpox vaccine, the risk of myo/pericarditis is listed as 1 per 6,000 to 7,000 vaccinated, but notes that the “actual risk may be higher.” Slide 12 also notes that “other new adverse events case definitions” are “in progress,” such as “new onset acute urticaria,” and “angioedema evolving to chronic disease after live virus vaccines.”
Vaccine News Around the Globe — The Insanity Spreads
Barring financial motives, it’s near-impossible to understand the current vaccine hysteria sweeping the globe. Italy recently passed a law mandating 12 vaccines for children attending state schools,21,22 and as of June 1, German child care centers and kindergartens are required — by law — to inform health authorities if parents have not submitted proof that they have received counseling about vaccination from pediatricians.
Fines for failing to receive vaccine counseling from a doctor could result in fines of up to $2800 (2500 euros).23 The mandatory reporting by schools of parents who have not received vaccine counseling is because of a spike in measles in Germany; 410 measles cases had been reported by mid-April, compared to 325 for all of 2016.24
Meanwhile, in the U.S., congressional members from Florida are urging the Army to hold public hearings before awarding exclusive rights to Sanofi to develop a Zika vaccine — rights that would give them a monopoly on the vaccine until 2036, without preset conditions on pricing.25
The question no one seems to care about is whether a Zika vaccine is needed at all. Why is the U.S. military partnering with a private drug company over a virus of such low to no concern?26 Puerto Rico recently declared an end to its outbreak, and transmission has evaporated in Brazil, American Samoa, New Caledonia and Saint Barthelemy, as well.27
While the birth defect microcephaly is one of the primary risks allegedly associated with Zika infection, outcome statistics reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control suggest the risk is quite low. In the U.S., of 1,579 pregnant women with lab confirmed Zika infection in 2016 until May 23, 2017, 72 delivered babies with some form of birth defect, and eight women who lost their child to miscarriage or stillbirth had a child with some form of birth defect.28
But is Zika-induced microcephaly really a cause for concern? As far back as 2009, the average annual number of microcephaly cases reported in the U.S. was 25,000 — without a Zika virus in sight.29
Clearly, Zika virus is NOT the only, nor a major, contributor to microcephaly. Also, recall this: In January 2016, models predicted 60 percent of the U.S. population would become infected with the dreaded Zika by that summer30 — 60 percent! Clearly, that did not happen, but there were no mass announcements declaring the doomsday prediction null and void.
Military Abuse: Secret Shots

In my view, the hysterics calling for mandatory inoculations with this-that-or-the-other vaccine are driven by something other than desire to protect public health. If that were their aim, they would not be eager to sacrifice people so wantonly. Even if “only” 2 percent of the U.S. population is predisposed to vaccine injury, we are talking about nearly 6.2 MILLION men, women and children! That’s no small price tag.
That military personnel are used as guinea pigs for experimental vaccines is also morally reprehensible. The video above is a Target 5 News report from 2007, questioning whether our servicemen and women are being recruited into secret medical experiments without their knowledge or consent.
By all appearances, that’s exactly what’s happening. The question is how long will our leaders allow these violations of human rights to go on? If recent legislation is any indication, it appears secret medical experimentation is being weaseled into law, making the American public fair game as well.
The 21st Century Cures Act, which was quickly pushed through Congress and became law in December 2016, allows the waiving of the requirement of informed consent for participants in clinical trials if researchers believe an experimental medical device, drug or vaccine being tested poses no more than minimal risk to the patient’s health, or if the product being tested is deemed by researchers to be in the best interest of trial participants.
The Act also lowers FDA standards for the quality of evidence that drug companies have to provide to the FDA before drugs and vaccines are licensed and sold in the U.S. When you consider the big picture, you’d have to be sticking your head in the sand to not care about vaccine safety these days.
With forced vaccinations spreading like wildfire around the globe, we must all fight back and insist on informed consent to medical risk taking, and the right to say no to any vaccine we deem not in our best interest or the best interest of our child.

Protect Your Right to Informed Consent and Defend Vaccine Exemptions

With all the uncertainty surrounding the safety and efficacy of vaccines, it’s critical to protect your right to make independent health choices and exercise voluntary informed consent to vaccination. It is urgent that everyone in America stand up and fight to protect and expand vaccine informed consent protections in state public health and employment laws. The best way to do this is to get personally involved with your state legislators and educating the leaders in your community.

NVIC Advocacy poster

THINK GLOBALLY, ACT LOCALLY.

National vaccine policy recommendations are made at the federal level but vaccine laws are made at the state level. It is at the state level where your action to protect your vaccine choice rights can have the greatest impact.

It is critical for EVERYONE to get involved now in standing up for the legal right to make voluntary vaccine choices in America because those choices are being threatened by lobbyists representing drug companies, medical trade associations, and public health officials, who are trying to persuade legislators to strip all vaccine exemptions from public health laws.

Signing up for NVIC’s free Advocacy Portal at http://www.NVICAdvocacy.org gives you immediate, easy access to your own state legislators on your smart phone or computer so you can make your voice heard. You will be kept up-to-date on the latest state bills threatening your vaccine choice rights and get practical, useful information to help you become an effective vaccine choice advocate in your own community.

Also, when national vaccine issues come up, you will have the up-to-date information and call to action items you need at your fingertips. So please, as your first step, sign up for the NVIC Advocacy Portal.

Share Your Story With the Media and People You Know

If you or a family member has suffered a serious vaccine reaction, injury, or death, please talk about it. If we don’t share information and experiences with one another, everybody feels alone and afraid to speak up. Write a letter to the editor if you have a different perspective on a vaccine story that appears in your local newspaper. Make a call in to a radio talk show that is only presenting one side of the vaccine story.

I must be frank with you; you have to be brave because you might be strongly criticized for daring to talk about the “other side” of the vaccine story. Be prepared for it and have the courage to not back down. Only by sharing our perspective and what we know to be true about vaccination, will the public conversation about vaccination open up so people are not afraid to talk about it.

We cannot allow the drug companies and medical trade associations funded by drug companies or public health officials promoting forced use of a growing list of vaccines to dominate the conversation about vaccination.

The vaccine injured cannot be swept under the carpet and treated like nothing more than “statistically acceptable collateral damage” of national one-size-fits-all mandatory vaccination policies that put way too many people at risk for injury and death. We shouldn’t be treating people like guinea pigs instead of human beings.

Internet Resources Where You Can Learn More

I encourage you to visit the website of the non-profit charity, the National Vaccine Information Center (NVIC), at www.NVIC.org:

  • NVIC Memorial for Vaccine Victims: View descriptions and photos of children and adults, who have suffered vaccine reactions, injuries, and deaths. If you or your child experiences an adverse vaccine event, please consider posting and sharing your story here.
  • If You Vaccinate, Ask 8 Questions: Learn how to recognize vaccine reaction symptoms and prevent vaccine injuries.
  • Vaccine Freedom Wall: View or post descriptions of harassment and sanctions by doctors, employers, and school and health officials for making independent vaccine choices.
  • Vaccine Failure Wall: View or post descriptions about vaccines that have failed to work and protect the vaccinated from disease.

Connect With Your Doctor or Find a New One That Will Listen and Care

If your pediatrician or doctor refuses to provide medical care to you or your child unless you agree to get vaccines you don’t want, I strongly encourage you to have the courage to find another doctor. Harassment, intimidation, and refusal of medical care is becoming the modus operandi of the medical establishment in an effort to stop the change in attitude of many parents about vaccinations after they become truly educated about health and vaccination. However, there is hope.

At least 15 percent of young doctors recently polled admit that they’re starting to adopt a more individualized approach to vaccinations in direct response to the vaccine safety concerns of parents.

It is good news that there is a growing number of smart young doctors, who prefer to work as partners with parents in making personalized vaccine decisions for children, including delaying vaccinations or giving children fewer vaccines on the same day or continuing to provide medical care for those families, who decline use of one or more vaccines.

So take the time to locate a doctor, who treats you with compassion and respect, and is willing to work with you to do what is right for your child.

 

Veterans Resources

Resource Guide for Veterans

ssr-law-office-clinton-township-mi-veterans-guide

In Eastern Michigan, there is a strong and interconnected community supporting the men and women who serve and have served our country. We believe veterans deserve our gratitude and support for their dedication and service. That’s why SSR Law Office has produced this Veterans Resource Guide.

The purpose of this guide is to provide information on nonprofit and governmental resources to retired or serving veterans and/or military personnel in Macomb, Oakland, Wayne, Monroe, St. Clair, Lapeer, Livingston, Washtenaw, Genesee and surrounding counties. It is our intent that this information will empower and support the men and women who serve and have served our country.

Many organizations provide support to veterans. These services include housing, food programs, educational opportunities, counseling and legal help. We hope you find the following Veterans Resource Guide useful and comprehensive.

Alcohol, Drugs & Rehab

Many Macomb County veterans suffer from alcohol and drug abuse. The abuses can be associated with many other situations in any particular vet’s life, but nonetheless these issues must be faced with forthright determination. Any type of addiction is tough to overcome, but alcohol and drugs can be some of the toughest forms of addiction. This is why it’s best to seek out help when you’re ready to begin your recovery process.

Whether it’s depression, anxiety, PTSD or any kind of psychological problem, many veterans need therapy to help hash out their problems. It makes sense that there are an endless amount of therapy resources that veterans can utilize, but so many veterans don’t utilize these resources enough. If you or a loved one is a veteran who is struggling you need to understand all of the resources that are out there to help veterans overcome just about anything.

This section is a comprehensive overview of what you’ll need to know in terms of how veterans can get the help they need for alcohol and drug addiction treatments. If you know where to go in your area, who to speak to and if you’re ready to face your alcohol and drug problems, you’ll be much more prepared for a successful recovery and sobriety.

Don’t let drugs and alcohol get in your way of being the best version of yourself. The following information is here to help you help yourself. Always know, there is someone out there who really wants to help you. All you need to do is reach out.

Fallow the link below for more information,

https://www.ssrlawoffice.com/veterans-resources/

Anxiety Management Tips for Parents Facing the Holidays

Image courtesy of Pixabay

Parenting is tough at any time of year, but when the holidays roll around, look out!  It’s that magical time of year when anxiety can kick in and take over – overthinking, overeating, overspending.  Next thing you know you’re just over it, all of it.  But you know what?  You can overcome it, and here’s how.

Connect, connect, connect

You know those people in your life who make you feel good and you smile when you think about them?  Spend time with those people during the holiday season.  The positive people who lift you up help lower your stress levels and remind you of all of your best qualities.  And if family members or friends offer to lend you a hand during the holidays, take it!  Accepting help doesn’t mean you are a lesser mom, it means you are smart enough to allow people who care about you to help out during the holiday season.

Talk with the kids

The American Psychological Association recommends that you talk with your kids about the holiday season.  Take opportunities to tell your children about all the different ways to celebrate the holidays, like which traditions your family embraces and why.  It’s also time to share with them what other families might believe and how they celebrate, or why they don’t celebrate.  Some experts suggest starting a new tradition or ritual with the holiday season.  It helps your family feel like one cohesive unit, which helps parents and kids develop better coping skills.

Enjoy self-care

Find some fun and relaxing ways to enjoy yourself this holiday season.  Eat right, exercise, get your nails done, go to a movie.  I know, your schedule is so tight you can’t squeeze any of that in.  But you need to make time, because it’s good for you, and you deserve it.  Start by taking time out of the tv schedule to go for a walk with the kids, it’ll be good for all of you!

Volunteer

According to the HelpGuide, volunteering can be a boost to your mental health and help reduce your anxiety.  The holiday season offers a wealth of volunteer opportunities.  You can work at a soup kitchen or ring a bell outside a department store.  It’s a great opportunity to talk to your kids about helping others and actually demonstrating ways to do it, too.  And hey, take the kids with you!

Be realistic

The holidays are an important time to check your perspective.  Are you setting unrealistic expectations?  You don’t need to be all things to all people, and this doesn’t need to be the “picture perfect” holiday.  Those things that you don’t get done before or during the holiday season will be waiting for you when the season is over.  You can catch them up then.  Don’t have time or energy to clean the house?  Hire a maid service!  It’ll free you up to get your shopping done, enjoy the kids while they are off from school, maybe even do some of that self-care stuff you don’t believe you can squeeze in!  You may be thinking it’s too expensive, but according to HomeAdvisor the average price in Cincinnati is between $113 – $232, and takes about four hours.  Totally worth it!

Change your beliefs

The holiday season won’t last forever, and you have a great track record – you survived every holiday season before this one.  Set goals you can manage, and when the little voices in your head say you can’t do this, know that you can.  If a day is getting away from you, roll with it!  The experts at Psychology Today tell us we get into trouble as parents when we try to stick too hard to our normal routine during the holiday season.  Let it go!  Instead of thinking “out of control,” think “child-like fun!”

Enjoy the joy!

Don’t lose track of yourself and get stuck in a season of anxiety – keep this a season of joy.  Flex your schedules, flex some rules, and do some things for yourself.  You’ll come through the season with flying colors!

When A Soldier Comes Home (Trace Adkins- Till The Last Shot’s Fired)

Patient Engagement in PTSD Treatment

For patients with PTSD to derive the greatest benefit
from available evidence-based psychotherapies and
psychiatric medications they must be able to fully
engage in their treatment. However, a wealth of
published data demonstrates that a majority of service
members and Veterans with PTSD are not successful
in doing so (e.g., Hoge et al., 2014; Spoont, Murdoch,
Hodges, & Nugent, 2010). Patient engagement in
mental health services has received relatively little
attention as compared to the substantial consideration
given to patient engagement in the design and
delivery of patient-centered physical health care
(Carman et al., 2013). Below, we provide a selective
review of the available literature in an attempt to
describe factors that make patients more likely to
engage in PTSD treatment and identify interventions
that may improve patient engagement in PTSD
treatment, with a focus on evidence-based treatments.
Following Gruman et al.’s (2010) conceptualization,
we define patient engagement as the behaviors
required to achieve optimal benefit from health care.
The review focuses on the three aspects of
engagement most often examined in the PTSD
literature: treatment initiation (utilizing care; starting
treatment), retention (completing the intended
course of treatment), and adherence (performing
behaviors in the treatment plan). The scope of the
review is adult patients’ engagement in PTSD
treatment; however, due to limited data regarding
civilians’ engagement, a majority of the studies
reviewed focus on active duty and Veteran populations.
Following the review, we evaluate this literature
within a patient engagement conceptual framework
and suggest future research directions.
Factors Associated with Engagement
Demographic factors such as age, gender, race, and
ethnicity have been the most frequently studied and
are among the few variables that have consistently
demonstrated significant associations with treatment
initiation and retention across studies. Patient
age has r
epeatedly been found to predict initiation
and retention in general mental health treatment,
psychotherapy, and evidence-based psychotherapy
(EBP) in that younger patients are less likely to
initiate and be retained in treatment (Goetter et al.,
2015; Kehle-Forbes, Meis, Spoont, & Polusny, 2016;
Spoont et al., 2014). Patient race has also been
shown to be associated with treatment initiation and
retention, although not as consistently as age
(Goetter et al., 2015; Spoont, Hodges, Murdoch, &
Nugent, 2009; Spoont et al., 2015). For example,
African American and Latino Veterans were found
to be less likely than white Veterans to receive
a minimally adequate trial of treatment (both
psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for African
American Veterans; pharmacotherapy only for Latino
Veterans) within six months of PTSD diagnosis
(Spoont et al., 2015). Negative attitudes towards
psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy (e.g., believing
that treatment wouldn’t be helpful) accounted for
the disparity in Latino Veterans’ retention, but the
disparities in African American Veterans’ retention
remained after accounting for treatment-related
beliefs (Spoont et al., 2015). Findings regarding
the associations between engagement and other
demographic variables such as Veterans’ service
connection status, marital status, and employment
have been equivocal (Goetter et al., 2015; Mott,
Mondragon, et al., 2014; Grubbs et al., 2015).
Potentially modifiable factors underlying differences
in engagement between demographic groups should
be the focus of future research.
Pretreatment symptomology and patients’ social
environments are two nondemographic factors that
have been subject to considerable study. Research
regarding the impact of PTSD severity on initiation
and retention has yielded inconsistent results, with
some studies showing that higher total levels of
If you want to read the entire article click on the fallowing link; Patient Engagement in PTSD Treatment

Sexual Desire, Function and Combat PTSD

While it’s something that many people don’t want to talk about, sex matters to people. Sexual function and sexual desire can be important parts of a person’s life, particularly if he or she is in a relationship. And, unfortunately, what we know is that combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affects a veteran’s sexual desire and sexual function in negative ways. In fact, some studies have showed such a correlation between sexual dysfunction and PTSD that some have proposed making it an official, diagnostic criteria.

Sexual Desire and Combat PTSD

Sexual desire, is, of course, one’s desire for sexual relations and whether one has a partner or not, this can be important. In a 2014 study, Problems in Sexual Functioning among Male OEF/OIF Veterans Seeking Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress, 63% of male veterans in the study reported sexual desire problems. Of those with partners, 72% reported a lack of sexual desire. According to the study, white race, combat exposure, social support, and avoidance/numbing symptoms predicted a lack of sexual desire. The 2008 study Sexual Functioning in War Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, found that veterans with PTSD had significantly reduced sexual activity including sexual fantasies, foreplay, oral sex, and intercourse, in the previous month. Veterans cited their own health problems as the reason for reduced sexual activity.

It’s not clear why veterans with combat PTSD experience a loss in sexual desire but I suspect the above study may have hit on one main reason: the PTSD symptoms of avoidance/numbing. These symptoms often produce a lack of emotional intimacy in relationships and it only stands to reason that sexual intimacy would also be reduced.

Sexual Function and Combat PTSD

Unfortunately, sexual desire and sexual function can be impacted by combat posttraumatic stress disorder. Learn what to do about combat PTSD and sex.Several studies have focused on physical, sexual dysfunction in combat PTSD veterans. In Problems in Sexual Functioning among Male OEF/OIF Veterans Seeking Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress, an official erectile dysfunction diagnosis was present in 12% of male combat veterans while sexual arousal problems were present in 62% of partnered veterans.

In the 2002 study Sexual Dysfunction in Combat Veterans with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, “patients [combat veterans] with PTSD had poorer scores on overall satisfaction and orgasmic function and showed trends toward poorer scores on intercourse satisfaction and erectile function.” In this study, erectile dysfunction rate was 85% in veterans with PTSD while it was 22% in veterans without PTSD.

Medication, Sexual Function, Desire and Combat PTSD

It is not known why sexual desire and sexual function are so impeded in veterans with combat PTSD but part of the reason may be medication-related. Antidepressant therapy is common in combat PTSD treatment and this medication may impact desire, arousal, and sexual functioning.

How to Improve Sexual Desire and Functioning in Combat PTSD

Medication can address some sexual dysfunction issues and if the sexual function or arousal is being impacted due to a PTSD medication, a change in medication can often solve the problem. Many choices of medication exist so, in general, veterans should not have to live with this side effect.

Additionally, there is research that suggests that treating the underlying combat PTSD will correct the problems in sexual desire and function. This makes perfect sense. As other PTSD symptoms lessen, so do these ones.

Psychotherapy for combat PTSD is also often helpful in addressing these types of issues.

However, none of this help can be employed if the combat veteran is not open about what is happening for him or her so my biggest piece of advice for veterans experiencing reduced sexual desire or functioning is to be open with his or her healthcare provider so that you can look for a solution together. And remember: this, too, can be a symptom of combat PTSD and is not your fault.

 

https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/understandingcombatptsd/2015/01/sexual-desire-function-and-combat-ptsd/

Sanctuary Trauma and the ‘Sacred’ This is also a problem in the USA

Some Veterans experience traumas beyond the battlefield. One of these can be called, “sanctuary trauma”. A concept developed by Dr. Steven Silver, sanctuary trauma “occurs when an individual who su…

Source: Sanctuary Trauma and the ‘Sacred’

Helping the veteran community.

Image may contain: 2 people, people standing

This veteran is from the Vietnam conflict and is a former POW. He needed to move residences at short notice. The previous landlord didn’t want to fix the house where he was staying. Instead of fixing the house, the landlord gave the veteran 3 days to move out. Tri-state Veterans Community Alliance (TVCA) contacted me and Ken to see if we could help this veteran.

 

I got a vision from God to help the veteran community in some way. This was our first project from that vision and it went well. The veteran needed the next home painted and help with the move. On Saturday my son, Ken, and I painted the house as much as we could. The new landlord didn’t bring enough paint, so we did what we could with the time and supplies we had. On Monday, Jack, a friend from my church Crossroads, Elizabeth, a member of Team RWB, Ria, a member of Team Rubicon, and I packed and made 3 trips of furniture and other goods to move the veteran.

 

We are trying to start a group that would help veterans with things, like moving, if they don’t have the money for it. Also, with painting if they don’t have anyone to paint for them and other things like putting a window A/C in. The idea is to connect as many of the organizations that want to help veterans together to make an impact on the every day life of the disabled veterans in the community. This was an effort put together from TVCA, to Ken and I, then we contacted Team RWB, Team Rubicon, WWP, Good Will, and Easter Seals. There was only a small group of us that came together and it was a great success.
I would like to know if there is an organization doing something like what we did and learn more of any ones experience.

 

The First link is a small video of the move and the second of the painting.

 

https://www.facebook.com/rey.centeno.319/videos/10154707778203247/

https://www.facebook.com/rey.centeno.319/videos/10154707779048247/